Customer Helpline (UK) : 01436 820269
Subscribe to our Aviation Art Newsletter!

You currently have no items in your basket

Join us on Facebook!

Payment Options Display
Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Follow us on Twitter!

Valuations

Classified Ads Terms and Conditions Shipping Info Contact Details

FANTASTIC SAVINGS ON ORIGINAL PAINTINGS BY DAVID PENTLAND   -   MAKE US AN OFFER !
Aircraft
Search
Squadron
Search
Signature
Search
Tank
Search
SEE THIS MONTH'S SPECIAL OFFERS
Product Search         
CLICK HERE FOR A FULL LIST OF ALL DAVID PENTLAND PRINTS BY TITLE
Pilot Signed P51 Mustang Art Prints by Gerald Coulson and David Pentland. - DavidPentland.com

DHM2303.  Top Cover by Gerald Coulson. <p>Big Brothers and Little Friends : the enduring bond between the bomber crews and fighter pilots of the USAAF Eighth Air Force in their prolonged and hotly contested air war against Hitlers Nazi Germany, 1942-1945. <b><p>Signed by <a href=signature.php?Signature=290>Colonel C E Bud Anderson</a>, <br><a href=signature.php?Signature=300>Lieutenant Colonel Robert A Karr</a> <br>and <br><a href=signature.php?Signature=299>Lieutenant Colonel Clyde B East</a>. <p>Limited edition of 400 prints, with three signatures. <p> Paper size 29 inches x 24 inches (74cm x 61cm)
DHM0780. Dove of Peace by David Pentland. <p> P51D of Colonel Glenn Duncan C.O. of the 353rd Fighter Group, along with Betty-E flown by Lt. Colonel Wayne Blickenstaff, taking off on one of their last missions of the war, April 1945. <b><p>Signed by <a href=signature.php?Signature=2154>Lt Col Donald S Bryan (deceased)</a>. <p> Bryan Signature edition of 200 prints from the signed limited edition of 1150 prints. <p> Image size 17 inches x 12 inches (43cm x 31cm)

Please note that our logo (below) only appears on the images on our website and is not on the actual art prints.


When you are ready to add this item to your basket, click the button below.

 

 

  Website Price: 220.00  

Quantity:
 

 

Pilot Signed P51 Mustang Art Prints by Gerald Coulson and David Pentland.

PCK2631. Pilot Signed P51 Mustang Art Prints by Gerald Coulson and David Pentland.

Aviation Print Pack.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

DHM2303. Top Cover by Gerald Coulson.

Big Brothers and Little Friends : the enduring bond between the bomber crews and fighter pilots of the USAAF Eighth Air Force in their prolonged and hotly contested air war against Hitlers Nazi Germany, 1942-1945.

Signed by Colonel C E Bud Anderson,
Lieutenant Colonel Robert A Karr
and
Lieutenant Colonel Clyde B East.

Limited edition of 400 prints, with three signatures.

Paper size 29 inches x 24 inches (74cm x 61cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

DHM0780. Dove of Peace by David Pentland.

P51D of Colonel Glenn Duncan C.O. of the 353rd Fighter Group, along with Betty-E flown by Lt. Colonel Wayne Blickenstaff, taking off on one of their last missions of the war, April 1945.

Signed by Lt Col Donald S Bryan (deceased).

Bryan Signature edition of 200 prints from the signed limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 17 inches x 12 inches (43cm x 31cm)


Website Price: 220.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost 400.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save 180




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

Signatures on this item
NameInfo




Colonel C E Bud Anderson
Bud Anderson went to England with the 357th Fighter Group in 1943, the first Eighth Air Force Group to be equipped with the P-51 Mustang. He got himself on the score sheet on one of the first Berlin missions, dog fighting with a bunch of Me109s who had set upon a straggling B-17. On 29th June 1944, leading his squadron on a mission to Leipzig, they ran into a formation of Fw190s. In the ensuing battle Anderson shot down the leader, and two more Fw190s. After a short rest in the U.S., Bud returned for a second tour, just in time for the 357th's big day on 27th November 1944. With the 353rd they took on a huge formation of some 200 enemy fighters, Anderson adding three more to his score. He finished the war with 16 air victories and many more probables.




Lieutenant Colonel Clyde B East (deceased)
Born in Pittsylvania County, Virginia on July 19, 1921, raised on a rural family farm. At 19, Clyde East traveled to Hamilton, Ontario, Canada and enlisted into the Royal Canadian Air Force. Soon after, East was admitted to pilot training and completed his training in 1942. Clyde East went on active servcie to England, where he flew interdiction missions in the P-51A Mustang, attacking ground targets in France, Belgium, and Holland. He also searched for U-boats over the water. Clyde East flew P51 Mustangs with 414 Fighter / Reconnaissance Squadron RCAF in England, before transferring to the USAAF in January 1944. He joined the 15th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron on 2nd February flying F-6C Mustangs. On June 6, 1944, East participated in the D-Day invasion of Normandy in the Mustang. It was during this mission that East and his wingman stumbled upon several FW-190s landing and promptly dispatched them with their .50 caliber machine guns, claiming the first aerial victories of the invasion. During one mission East claimed three aerial victories and, on another, was able to jump a German Messerschmitt 109 flying low. In late 1944, East fought against a German counteroffensive in what is now known as the Battle of the Bulge. Becoming a confirmed ace in March 1945, East would go on to claim a total of 13 aerial kills against the German Luftwaffe and flew over 200 combat missions with them during the war. He later served in Korea, flying 100 missions in RF-51s and RF-80s. After his return from Korea East was given command of several different tactical recon squadrons, one of which flew an additional 100 visual and photo missions over Cuba. He retired from the Air Force as a Lieutenant Colonel in February 1965. Clyde East died on 30th July 2014 aged 93.




Lieutenant Colonel Robert A Karr (deceased)
Robert Karr was born on January 11, 1924, in Waterloo, Iowa. Robert enlisted in the U.S. Army Reserve on July 31, 1942, and entered the Aviation Cadet Program of the U.S. Army Air Forces on February 8, 1943, receiving his commission as a 2d Lt and pilot wings at Spence Field, Georgia, on November 3, 1943. After completing P-47 Thunderbolt training and serving with the 536th Fighter Squadron of the 87th Fighter Group, Lt Karr was assigned as a P-51C Mustang pilot with the 5th Fighter Squadron of the 52nd Fighter Group in North Africa and Italy from May 1944 to June 1945. Operating out of Madna Airfield in Italy, he got his first victory when he downed an Me109 near Udine on 9th June, adding two more a few weeks later. On 17th July, leading a flight of P51Ds, he shot down three more Me109s in a day near Blata, Poland. A P51 Ace with 6 victories plus 2 more damaged in the air to his credit, he retired from the service in 1976.
Signatures on item 2
NameInfo


Lt Col Donald S Bryan (deceased)
Originally a P-40 instructor with the 79th Fighter Squadron, 20th Fighter Group, Don Bryan then transferred to the 328th Fighter Squadron, 352nd Fighter Group as a flight leader flying P-47s. Moving to Bodney, England, in June, he flew with the group on its first combat mission in September, flying his P-47 "Little One", named after his girlfriend Frances Norman. In April 1944, he transferred to P-51s, "Little One II" and "Little One III", and completed his first combat tour in May 1944. He returned to the 328th Fighter Squadron in August, became an Ace two months later, and gained "Ace in a Day" status on 2nd November when he downed five Fw190s in a single mission. Don flew 140 combat missions, never lost a wingman, and was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, second only to the Medal of Honor. Lt Col Bryan died on 15th May 2012.

This Week's Half Price Art

 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the three-quarters stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - 75.00
In the final moments of extra time of the game, the England number 10, Jonny Wilkinson slotted a perfect drop goal which clinched victory over Australia, winning 20 points to 17.

Rugby World Cup Final 2003 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
B40. Jean Alesi/ Benetton B.196

Jean Alesi/ Benetton B.196 by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - 45.00
 Racing off the Needles Rocks, Isle of Wight, 1923.
Norada & Mariquita by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00

 Damon Hill passes Michael Schumacher, Argentine Grand Prix, 1995.

Going For It by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - 33.00
GITW1472GS.  The Finish. The Forest Stakes by Henry Alken.
The Finish. The Forest Stakes by Henry Alken. (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00
Eddie Irvine raced Formula Ford from 1983 to 1988.  Driving a variety of different chassis, he won two Formula Ford championships by the end of 1987.  In 1988, Eddie drove in the British Formula Three championship and then joined the Jordan Formula 3000 team for 1990.  He won his first race at Hockenheim, finishing third overall in the championship that year.  The following three years saw Eddie driving in the Japanese F3000 series, almost winninh the title in 1993.  He also drove for Toyota at Le Mans holding the lap record for several years.  At the end of 1993 Eddie drove for the Jordan F1 team and gained notoriety by overtaking Ayrton Senna having only just been lapped by him.  In 1996, Eddie took on the unenviable role as number two to Michael Schumacher at Ferrari but in 1999 became the number one driver for Ferrari following a serious accident for Schumacher.

Tribute to Eddie Irvine by Stuart McIntyre.
Half Price! - 23.00
Champion racing horse West Tip at Cheltenham race course.

West Tip by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - 20.00

This Week's Half Price Military Art

In 1805 Colonel Congreve invented the rocket which was placed in the hands of the Rocket Brigade of the Royal Artillery and landing parties of the Royal Navy. Rockets were cheap and simple weapons, light enough to be carried in large numbers , and could be fired in large salvoes from portable rests. The employment of the rocket was sporadic and extremely limited. This was due to its unreliability -- rockets had an unpleasant habit of curving in the air and returning to burst at the feet of those using them -- and its inaccuracy compared with gunfire. In the Peninsular War the erratic behaviour of the projectiles fired by a rocket battery made a most unfavourable impression on Lord Wellington. However, the psychological effect on the enemy was quite powerful, and horses could never stand rocket fire.  The 2nd Rocket Troop left England for Germany in August 1813 and played a distinguished part in the Battle of Leipzig, 16th-18th October. It was the only unit of the British Army present, and was attached to the bodyguard of the Prince of Sweden. Rockets had to be fired at close range to achieve any real success. The rocketeers, given a guard of Swedish dragoons, advanced to attack five Saxon battalions of the French army in the village of Paunsdorf. They opened a destructive fire, which was returned by musketry, and a hot combat ensued. Against the perfect targets presented by the enemy manoeuvring in the mass formations of the period the Troop's 28 rocket tubes did excellent service. When the enemy fell into confusion and began to retreat, Captain R. Bogue, the commander of the Rocket Troop, charged at the head of the squadron of cavalry, and over 2000 enemy surrendered. He was killed at the moment of victory.  At Leipzig the 9-pounder rockets were placed on the ground, pointed at the enemy and fired. A small iron trough for this purpose was carried (in a leather cover) on top of the saddle roll of every third man. Swords were attached to the saddles in action, and the troopers had a double-barrelled pistol in a holster on the left hip. The horse furniture included large leather holsters to carry rockets.

The Rocket Brigade at the Battle of Leipzig, 16th-18th October 1813 by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 22 SAS Squadron in the Gulf, having been dropped by Chinook of the 7th Squadron RAF.

The Winged Dagger by Simon Smith. (YB)
Half Price! - 230.00
 At 0620 hours covered by a brief barrage from 1000 guns, Brigadier General Elles in a MkIV called Hilda led his 476 tanks against the impregnable German Hindenburg line at Cambrai.  Supported by 6 infantry divisions and 4 Royal Flying Corps squadrons flying ground attack missions, the attack had broken through 3 trench lines and penetrated 5 miles on a 6 mile front by lunchtime.  Although these gains were not exploited and later retaken by a German counter offensive, Cambrai showed the full potential of the tank on the battlefield.

To the Green Fields Beyond, Cambrai, France, 20th November 1917 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
Cavalry and Legionaries (plus Auxiliary Hamian Archer) of the XIVth Legion.

AD61 by Chris Collingwood (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00

This Week's Half Price Aviation Art

 USS Kearsarge CV33, USS Princeton and USS Rochester  CA124 in Korea 1952 with bearcats over the top.

USS Kearsarge by Randall Wilson (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 A Mosquito Mk.BIX above the clouds in late 1943.  Mosquito B.IX LR503 holds the record for the most combat missions flown by a single Allied bomber in the Second World War, serving 213 sorties.

A De Havilland Beauty by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 HM Stephen - one of the Battle of Britains top scoring fighter pilots, brings down two Me109s in quick succession over the White Cliffs of Dover, early on August 11, 1940. Flying a Spitfire with 74 Squadron, HM shot down five German aircraft on this day, and damaged a further three. The note in his log book starts First flap of the day at 0600 hrs ...  <br><br><b>Published 2000.<br><br>Sadly, all of the pilots who signed this edition have since passed away.</b>

First Flap of the Day by Nicolas Trudgian. (E)
Half Price! - 145.00
 The Avro Lancaster B MkIII ED932(G), AJ-G, of Wing Commander Guy Gibson was the first aircraft to make an attempt at breaching the Möhne Dam on the night of 16/17th of May 1943 as Operation Chastise got underway.  Having already made one 'sighting' run over the target, Gibson turned and began his second run, the flak and 20mm fire from the shore and from the towers of the dam now throwing up a hail of fire. Undeterred, the Upkeep mine was released, skipping across the water as planned, but striking the dam wall off centre with no visible effect. Gibson made several passes over the Möhne, each time escorting the attacking aircraft in an attempt to draw the enemy fire.  With the Möhne finally breached, he led the remaining aircraft on to the Eder dam with similar success before returning safely to Manston.

First Strike by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - 1100.00

 

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email:

Return to Home Page