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US Airborne Paratrooper Prints by Robert Taylor and David Pentland. - DavidPentland.com

DHM6108AP. Day Drop - Stick 21 by Robert Taylor. <p> At 23.45 on the night of 5 June 1944, the 101st Airborne's most legendary unit of combat paratroopers - the notorious 'Filthy Thirteen' - jumped into France near the village of Sainte Mere Eglise, in the final hours before the D-Day landings.  They were the Screaming Eagles' most notorious unit, a small bunch of raw, tough, ruthless young men.  Hard drinking and savage fighting - and that was only in training - with scant regard for authority.  And if the reputation of this unique bunch of renegades within the ranks of the 101st was formidable, for the Germans it became one of sheer terror.  Officially they were the First Demolition Squadron, HQ Company, 506th PIR, 101st Airborne.  Unofficially they were the 'Filthy Thirteen'.  Superbly crafted in his unique blend of pencil and paint on tinted paper, Robert Taylor's classic new Master Drawing captures the moment on the night of 5 June 1944 when the 101st Airborne's legendary squad of elite paratroopers jump into battle in the vital hours before the D-Day landings commence.  The pilots of the 440th Troop Carrier Group struggle to keep their Dakotas level as deadly flak pummels the formation. <b><p>Signed by <a href=signature.php?Signature=2507>Sergeant Jake McNiece</a><br>and<br><a href=signature.php?Signature=2508>Private 1st Class Jack Wormer</a>. <p>Limited edition of 25 artist proofs.  <p> Paper size 27 inches x 20 inches (69cm x 51cm)
DHM1982. Holding the Line by David Pentland. <p> Vielsalm, Belgium, 22nd December 1944.  Men of the 508th PIR, along with the rest of the 82nd Airborne Division were rushed to the Ardennes and deployed in an attempt to halt the onslaught of 6th SS Panzer Army, specifically Kampfgruppe Peiper. <b><p>Signed limited edition of 75 prints.  <p> Image size 16 inches x 11 inches (41cm x 28cm)

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US Airborne Paratrooper Prints by Robert Taylor and David Pentland.

PCK2562. US Airborne Paratrooper Prints by Robert Taylor and David Pentland.

Military Print Pack.

Items in this pack :

Item #1 - Click to view individual item

DHM6108AP. Day Drop - Stick 21 by Robert Taylor.

At 23.45 on the night of 5 June 1944, the 101st Airborne's most legendary unit of combat paratroopers - the notorious 'Filthy Thirteen' - jumped into France near the village of Sainte Mere Eglise, in the final hours before the D-Day landings. They were the Screaming Eagles' most notorious unit, a small bunch of raw, tough, ruthless young men. Hard drinking and savage fighting - and that was only in training - with scant regard for authority. And if the reputation of this unique bunch of renegades within the ranks of the 101st was formidable, for the Germans it became one of sheer terror. Officially they were the First Demolition Squadron, HQ Company, 506th PIR, 101st Airborne. Unofficially they were the 'Filthy Thirteen'. Superbly crafted in his unique blend of pencil and paint on tinted paper, Robert Taylor's classic new Master Drawing captures the moment on the night of 5 June 1944 when the 101st Airborne's legendary squad of elite paratroopers jump into battle in the vital hours before the D-Day landings commence. The pilots of the 440th Troop Carrier Group struggle to keep their Dakotas level as deadly flak pummels the formation.

Signed by Sergeant Jake McNiece
and
Private 1st Class Jack Wormer.

Limited edition of 25 artist proofs.

Paper size 27 inches x 20 inches (69cm x 51cm)


Item #2 - Click to view individual item

DHM1982. Holding the Line by David Pentland.

Vielsalm, Belgium, 22nd December 1944. Men of the 508th PIR, along with the rest of the 82nd Airborne Division were rushed to the Ardennes and deployed in an attempt to halt the onslaught of 6th SS Panzer Army, specifically Kampfgruppe Peiper.

Signed limited edition of 75 prints.

Image size 16 inches x 11 inches (41cm x 28cm)


Website Price: 190.00  

To purchase these prints individually at their normal retail price would cost 320.00 . By buying them together in this special pack, you save 130




All prices are displayed in British Pounds Sterling

 

Signatures on this item
NameInfo


Private 1st Class Jack Wormer
Joining the Filthy Thirteen before D-Day he was the best shot in the unit. Separated on the D-Day drop he initially fought alongside the 501st PIR before being reunited with his company.


Sergeant Jake McNiece
The unofficial leader of the Filthy Thirteen, Jake McNiece was the inspiration for the Mohawk haircuts and war paint that the men wore on D-Day. He survived four combat jumps during WWII

This Week's Half Price Art

 Elf Tyrrell Ford 006.  World Champion 1973.
Jackie Stewart by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - 25.00
SPC5003. Rory Underwood by Rodger Towers.

Rory Underwood by Rodger Towers.
Half Price! - 60.00
Johnny Herbert is shown in the Benetton B195.  Herbert took a deserved victory at his home British Grand Prix at Silverstone, beating the Ferrari of Frenchman Jean Alesi into second place by more than 16 seconds, and ahead of fellow briton David Coulthard in the third placed Williams.  He also claimed victory at the Italian Grand Prix at Monza.  Along with Michael Schumachers nine victories, Herbert  helped Benetton win their first constructors championship in the 1995 season.  The Formula One Benetton B195 was designed by Rory Byrne and Ross Brawn for use in the 1995 Formula One season by Benetton.  The B195 was almost identical to the B194 but for a change of engine supplier from Ford to Renault V10 engine, the same type the rival Williams team was using.  With his first two Formula One wins under his belt in 1995, Johnny Herbert won just one more race, winning at the Nurburgring at the European Grand Prix in 1999, racing for Stewart Ford.  He retired from Formula One in 2000.

Johnny Herbert/ Benetton B.195 by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - 45.00
GIMK0601GS.  Outside The three Crowns by Heywood Hardy.

Outside The three Crowns by Heywood Hardy. (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00

 The Minstrel, 1977, Shergar, 1981, Golden Fleece, 1982, .Teenoso, 1983, Reference Point, 1987, Nashwan, 1989.

Derby Winners by Peter Deighan.
Half Price! - 100.00
 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the three-quarters stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - 75.00
GIFP0940GS. A rest from Fishing  by Alexander F Rolfe (1814 to 1875) (GS)
A rest from Fishing by Alexander F Rolfe (1814 to 1875) (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00
GIFP1191GS. Refreshments At The Inn by Warren Williams (GS)
Refreshments At The Inn by Warren Williams (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00

This Week's Half Price Military Art

The Battle of Hastings: While King Harold II  was defeating the Norse invasion at the battle of Stamford Bridge in the north, the Norman invasion led by the Norman Duke William landed in the south. A Norman force of 7,000 warriors sailed across the English Channel in 450 flat boats and landed at Pevensey in Sussex on September 28th. The following two weeks saw the Norman army organising and raiding the local area for supplies. On hearing of the invasion, King Harold marched south from York to London, a distance of 200 miles, in seven days. And on October 13th with his army of 7,000 men took up position on Senlac Hill, 8 miles north of Hastings. Harold took this position as this was the direct route for London. The following day, the Normans attacked the village (which is now the town of Battle). The Battle of Hastings was a battle between King Harolds infantry and the Norman cavalry and archers. The Saxon line threw back the first charge of Norman knights and as the knights began retiring, the Saxons began to pursue the cavalry but a counter attack by Williams disciplined knights cut down the Saxon infantry. King Harold reformed his line before the second Norman cavalry attack was launched. For many hours King Harolds Saxon infantry held their ground against the repeated cavalry charges, both sides suffered heavy losses. As the evening progressed the battle turned the Normans way, William feigned a withdrawal of his cavalry, the Saxon infantry again could not resist to break ranks and pursue the cavalry. Halfway down the hill Williams knights turned and charged the Saxon infantry. King Harold at this time was mortally wounded from an arrow in the eye and the victory was won by the Normans. Each side lost a quarter of their men and during the fighting William the Conqueror had three horses killed under him. Later he ordered the building of Battle Abbey on the battlefield. The way was clear to London and William the Conqueror was crowned King of England on Christmas day at Westminster Abbey.

Battle of Hastings by Brian Palmer (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
Somme Valley, Northern France, August 1944.  A Sherman Firefly of the Guards Armoured Division is greeted by members of the French Resistance as the division pushes north from the Seine towards the Somme bridges and on to Brussels.

Liberation - Sherman Tanks of the Guards Brigade by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 Military art print of French Grenadiers a Cheval at the battle of Eylau, 8th February 1807, fought against the Russian Army, a victory for Napoleon.

French Horse Guards by Edouard Detaille.
Half Price! - 35.00
Cruiser Tanks of 1st Royal Tank Regiment at the Battle of Beda Fomm.  6th February 1941: My friend Lt Col G Vesey Holt RTR has always considered that the deeds of 1 RTR at Beda Fomm have been neglected. To put this right he commissioned me to do a painting which he then presented to his Regiment. He obtained copies of the Regiment's War Diary. I was also greatly assisted by the staff of the Tank Museum, Bovington, which has examples of these tanks on display. On 6th February 1941, a column of Italian tanks and transport vehicles was proceeding southwards along the Benghasi-Tripoli road. In the late afternoon, B squadron engaged the enemy at about 500 yards from a hull down position behind a ridge, while five or six Cruisers of A Squadron crossed the road and proceeded south amongst the Italian column, firing on the transport and guns. It was raining heavily and visibility was poor.  The scene was littered with burning wreckage of Italian M13 tank and lorries. At about 1720 hours visibility became so bad that it was almost impossible to distinguish between friend and foe, and the tanks withdrew to re-group. No British tank was destroyed, though one was left damaged.  A Squadron is indicated by the triangle on the turrets, (red for the senior regiment in the brigade). An A9 is closest, with an A10 beyond. Commanders were almost invariably visible with their hatches open. The pennants on the antenna were a recognition sign, worn at different heights which changed daily. The white circle on a red square was the sign of 7th Armoured Division. The regiment's unit code sign was a white 24 on a red square. At this period British tanks had the multi-coloured diagonally striped pattern of camouflage.  The Cruiser A9 (Mark 1) had one 2-pounder gun and one .303-in. Vickers machine-gun mounted co-axially in the main turret, and one .303-in. Vickers mg in each of the two auxiliary turrets.  The Cruiser A10 (Mark 1A) had one 2-pounder gun and two 7.92-mm Besa machine-guns.

The Battle of Beda Fomm by David Rowlands (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00

This Week's Half Price Aviation Art

 A pair of Spitfire Mk.IIs of 610 Sqn roar into the air from Westhampnett in the Spring of 1941 to begin another cross-channel sweep, led by Sqn Ldr Tony Gaze flying DW-G.  Gaze was to finish the war with a victory total of eleven aircraft destroyed and three shared, these including a Messerschmitt 262 and Arado 234 jets and even a V-1.  He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross three times and, in 2006, received the Medal of the Order of Australia for his outstanding service to the Commonwealth.

Tribute to No.610 Sqn by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 Depicting Mustang aircraft escorting Flying Fortresses on a bombing raid over Germany.

Guardian Angel by Anthony Saunders. (P)
Half Price! - 3000.00
 Obersalzberg, a spectacularly picturesque area of southern Germany in the Bavarian Alps, became a focal point for the Allies as World War II was drawing to its close. This mountain village had become a Nazi stronghold after the Third Reich had seized houses, farms, and some 600 acres, and built private residences for Martin Bormann and Hermann Goering, an SS barracks, and erected a 30kmn fence around the perimeter to deter intrusion. At its centre was the Berghoff, Adolf Hitlers private mountain retreat.  Crowning Bormanns lavish building programme was the house he had built on a rocky spur almost 3000 feet above the Obersalzberg, some 6000 feet above sea level. Reached via a twisting road blasted out of the mountainside, the house was approached after entering a tunnel via a large brass two story elevator rising over 400 feet to the building. The Kelilsteinhaus was Martin Bormanns present for Hitter on the occasion of his 50th birthday in 1939. It was known by the Allies as the Eagles Nest.  Believing the Obersalzberg to be where Hitler and his closest henchmen would make their final stand, in April 1945 Allied bombing raids reduced much of the area to ruins. The Eagles Nest, intended as a private retreat from which Hitler could gaze over a conquered Europe, being an isolated target, survived this onslaught, and endures to this day.  Nicolas Trudgians painting shows P-51Ds of the 339th Fighter Group roaring over the rooftop of Hitlers now abandoned folly. With Germany and the Third Reich on the brink of defeat, this majestic aviation image conveys the poignant irony of the greatest lost cause in human history, with P-51 Mustangs providing a fitting symbol of victory over tyranny.

Mustangs Over the Eagles Nest by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
Half Price! - 180.00
 One of the final versions of the ubiquitous De Havilland Vampire to be built was the T.11, a two-seat trainer, one example of which was XE998, shown here in the colours of No.8 Flying School at RAF Swinderby in the early 1960s.  This aircraft is now preserved and on display in the Solent Sky Museum, although currently in the livery of the Swiss Air Force.

De Havilland Vampire T.11 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - 750.00

 

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