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The Count by David Pentland. (P)


The Count by David Pentland. (P)

Leutnant Walter Count Punski Krupinski of 4 Staffel, JG52 downs a Soviet R5 biplane on 25th September 1942. By the end of the day, 4 enemy aircraft would fall prey to his guns. One month later he received the Ritterkreutz having claimed 56 victories.
Item Code : DP0201PThe Count by David Pentland. (P) - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
ORIGINAL
DRAWING
Original pencil drawing by David Pentland.

Paper size 17 inches x 12 inches (43cm x 31cm) Wolfrum, Walter
+ Artist : David Pentland
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Signatures on this item
NameInfo




Walter Wolfrum (deceased)
Walter Wolfrum first saw combat in the Crimea with 5/JG52. He was shot down three times, and wounded twice before scoring his first victory. With his score at 70 he was again wounded, but returned to take command of 1/JG52 in May 1944, taking part in the fiercely fought defence of the Ploesti oilfields. he was again wounded, but returned to command 1/JG52 until the end of the war. he had flown 423 missions, achieved 137 victories, and was awarded the Knights Cross. Sadly, Walter Wolfrum passed away on 26th August 2010.
The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Me109Willy Messerschmitt designed the BF109 during the early 1930s. The Bf109 was one of the first all metal monocoque construction fighters with a closed canopy and retractable undercarriage. The engine of the Me109 was a V12 aero engine which was liquid-cooled. The Bf109 first saw operational service during the Spanish Civil War and flew to the end of World War II, during which time it was the backbone of the Luftwaffe fighter squadrons. During the Battle of Britian the Bf109 was used in the role of an escort fighter, a role for which it was not designed for, and it was also used as a fighter bomber. During the last days of May 1940 Robert Stanford-Tuck, the RAF ace, got the chance to fly an Me109 which they had rebuilt after it had crash landed. Stanford-Tuck found out that the Me109 was a wonderful little plane, it was slightly faster than the Spitfire, but lacked the Spitfire manoeuvrability. By testing the Me109, Tuck could put himself inside the Me109 when fighting them, knowing its weak and strong points. With the introduction of the improved Bf109F in the spring of 1941, the type again proved to be an effective fighter during the invasion of Yugoslavia and during the Battle of Crete and the invasion of Russia and it was used during the Siege of the Mediteranean island of Malta. The Bf109 was the main fighter for the Luftwaffe until 1942 when the Fw190 entered service and shared this position, and was partially replaced in Western Europe, but the Me109 continued to serve on the Eastern Front and during the defence of the Reich against the allied bombers. It was also used to good effect in the Mediterranean and North Africa in support of The Africa Korps. The Me109 was also supplied to several German allies, including Finland, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria, Croatia, and Slovakia. The Bf109 scored more kills than any other fighter of any country during the war and was built in greater numbers with a total of over 31,000 aircraft being built. The Bf109 was flown by the three top German aces of the war war. Erich Hartmann with 352 victories, Gerhard Barkhorn with 301 victories and Gunther Rall with 275 kills. Bf109 pilots were credited with the destruction of 100 or more enemy aircraft. Thirteen Luftwaffe Aces scored more than 200 kills. Altogether this group of pilots were credited with a total of nearly 15,000 kills, of which the Messerschmitt Bf109 was credited with over 10,000 of these victories. The Bf109 was the most produced warplane during World War II, with 30,573 examples built during the war, and the most produced fighter aircraft in history, with a total of 33,984 units produced up to April 1945. Bf109s remained in foreign service for many years after World War II. The Swiss used their Bf109Gs well into the 1950s. The Finnish Air Force did not retire their Bf109Gs until March 1954. Romania used its Bf109s until 1955. The Spanish Hispanos flew even longer. Some were still in service in the late 1960s.

This Week's Half Price Art

On 11th September 1944, Urban <i>Ben</i> Drew claimed his third aerial victory claiming another Me109 in his P-51 Mustang.

Urban 'Ben' Drew - Aerial Hat-Trick by Brian Bateman. (P)
Half Price! - 200.00
Operation AGRICOLA.  On 12th June 1999, 5 Airborne Brigade spearheaded the KFOR advance into Kosovo by securing the Kacanik Defile ahead of the ground forces.  The Brigade's joint airmobile operation with the UK support helicopter force followed a rapid strategic insertion to theatre.  The painting, commissioned by HQ 5 Airborne Brigade, depicts a composite scene, albeit an accurate interpretation, toward the northern end of the defile early on 12th June.  From the left, a Pathfinder patrol; a Medium Machine Gun team from 1 PARA; a reconnaissance section (in Land Rovers) from 1st Bn Royal Gurkha Rifles; a 3 PARA tom; a mine clearance team from 9 Para Squadron Royal Engineers; 216 Para Signal Squadron TACSAT; with Brigade HQ command group in their rear.  Above are Chinooks from 18 & 27 Squadrons RAF, with a Puma from 33 Squadron RAF on the bridge, with Apache helicopters of the US Army providing flank protection.  The painting is representative of the combined, joint, all-arms grouping of 5 Airborne Brigade on the day.

The Kacanick Defile by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 A Grob Viking glider belonging to the Air Cadets glides majestically over the English countryside.

Air Cadet Glider by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
A large umbrella of Spitfire Wings covered most of the sky over Dieppe during the Allied attack Operation Jubilee on 19th August 1942. Squadron leader Johnnie Johnson leads 610 (County of Chester) Squadron down from top cover support to lend a hand to Spitfires of 485 Squadron (New Zealand) and 411 Squadron (Canadian) which made up the 12 Group Wing, led by W/C Pat Jameson. The enemy being made up of a huge mixed force of Fw190 and Me109 fighters from JG2 and JG26. 12 Group Wing flew four times that disastrous day and in the end the Royal Air Force lost 106 aircraft compared to the Luftwaffe losses of 48.

The Battle for the Skies Over Dieppe, 19th August 1942 by Graeme Lothian (P)
Half Price! - 2000.00

 A trio of Spitfire Mk1s of 603 Sqn based at Biggin Hill are depicted on patrol in the Summer skies above Kent during the height of the Battle of Britain in August 1940. Lead aircraft is N3288 XT-H flown by Plt Off George Gilroy who finished the war with 14 confirmed victories, 10 shared and a further 14 aircraft destroyed in actions in which he was directly involved.

Biggin Trio by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - 65.00
 High in its element, a lone BAE Lightning F.6 glints in the evening sunshine as it returns from a sortie over the North Sea in the late 1970s.

The Sentinel by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 Albatros DIII of Godwin Brumowski about to shoot down a Caquot balloon.

Oberleutnant Godwin Brumowski by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 Handley Page 0/400s are attacked by German Albatross fighters as they return home from a raid during 1918.

Difficult Journey Home by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00

This Week's Half Price Sport Art

 At the end of the first race of the 2003 season, Neil Hodgson raises his fist in salute, serving notice that this year - 2003 - the title of Champion would be his.
Serving Notice by Robert Tomlin.
Half Price! - 30.00
B0050GS. Jean Alesi/ Ferrari 412 by Ivan Berryman.

Jean Alesi/ Ferrari 412 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the three-quarters stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - 75.00
 Michael Schumacher in his number one Ferrari at Monza.  Now a seven-times world champion, his dominant career will be looked upon as an epic achievement in the future.

Schumacher by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00

This Week's Half Price Military Art

A classic image depicting a victorious gladiator, about to dispatch his opponent, as an excited crowd give him the thumbs down!

Pollice Verso (Thumbs Down) by Jean Leon Jerome.
Half Price! - 35.00
 Men of Colonel Frosts 2 Para  retake the bridge after a German attempt lead by Captain Viktor Graebner of the 9th SS panzer Division (armoured  reconnaissance Troops) had failed.

Arnhem Bridge by Simon Smith (P)
Half Price! - 3500.00
DHM835GS. 19th Regiment Artillery (The Highland Gunners) by David Rowlands.
19th Regiment Artillery (The Highland Gunners) by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
After the charge up the valley and taking huge losses, The Light Brigade crashed through the Russian guns at the end of the valley. They were counter- charged by Russian cavalry. Shown here are the 11th and 8th Hussars engaging the Russian Uhlans and Dragoons. The losses to the Light Brigade were very high - 113 killed, and 134 wounded. General Pierre Bosquet after witnessing the charge remarked - It is magnificent but it is not war. The battle of Balaclava, finally ended leaving Balalcava still in British Hands.

Into the Valley of Death by Brian Palmer. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00

 

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