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Scramble by David Pentland. (P) - DavidPentland.com

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Scramble by David Pentland. (P)


Scramble by David Pentland. (P)

Robrough, Southern England, August 1940. Pilots of 247 Squadron, tasked with defending Plymouth, race to their Gloster Gladiator IIs in response to an intruder alert. Originally stationed in the Shetlands the squadron had been sent south to support the hard pressed units of fighter command during the Battle of Britain.
Item Code : DP0189PScramble by David Pentland. (P) - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
ORIGINAL
DRAWING
Original pencil drawing by David Pentland.

Paper size 17 inches x 12 inches (43cm x 31cm) Thom, Alex
Morewood, Roger
+ Artist : David Pentland
200 Off!Now : 300.00

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Other editions of this item : Scramble by David Pentland.DP0189
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTLimited edition of 30 giclee art prints. Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 21cm) Duckenfield, Byron
Morewood, Roger
+ Artist : David Pentland
25 Off!Now : 60.00VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 20 artist proofs. Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 21cm) Duckenfield, Byron
Morewood, Roger
+ Artist : David Pentland
20 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : 90.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTSignature edition of 2 prints. Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm) Duckenfield, Byron
Morewood, Roger
+ Artist : David Pentland
15 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : 250.00VIEW EDITION...
Extra Details :
About this edition :


Flt Lt Alex Thom signing this original drawing.


Roger Morewood signing this original pencil drawing.

Signatures on this item
NameInfo




Flight Lieutenant Alex Thom DFC
Born in Perth, Scotland, Alex Thom joined the RAFVR on June 24th 1939 and flew at the weekends at 11 EARFTS Perth. At the outbreak of World War Two, Thom was called up for full time service with the Royal Air Force and was posted to 3 ITW at Hastings on October 2nd 1939, moving to 15 EFTS at Redhill on April 29th 1940 and on June 15th moved again to 15 FTS, initially at Brize Norton and later to Chipping Norton. Alex Thom went to 6 OTU on September 29th at Sutton Bridge where he converted to Hawker Hurricanes and joined 79 squadron stationed at Pembury only for a short period when he was transferred to 87 Squadron on October 6th 1940, moving with the squadron on the 31st of October to their new base at Exeter. He achieved the rank of Pilot Officer on the 3rd of December 1941. During his time at Exeter he was also based on the Scilly Isles and on one occasion after shooting down an enemy bomber the crew bailed out over the sea. Alex Thom circled the downed German crew who were in a life raft until a motor launch came and picked them up. Thom would later meet the crew and was given a flying helmet by the German pilot, an item he still has today. Alex Thom was appointed B Flight commander on 10th July 1942 and was awarded the DFC on the 14th August 1942. At this time he was credited with two enemy aircraft destroyed and a probable He111. On the 19th of August 1942 while supporting the ground forces at Dieppe, his Hurricane (LK - M) was hit by ground fire and lost oil pressure. He managed to limp back to England where he made a forced landing at East Den. Thom managed to get back to his airfield as a passenger in a Master flown by Flt Sgt Lowe and immediately took off again in Hurricane (LK - A) back to Dieppe where he proceeded to strafe enemy positions. On the 1st of October 1942 he became F/O. In November 1942, 87 Squadron was transferred to North Africa. They were transported by ship to Gibraltar where the squadron flew sorties, and then onto North Africa. Thom was posted away from the squadron to be a flying control officer at Bone. He returned to 87 Squadron which was then based at Tongley and took command on June 27th 1943. He was again posted away from the squadron on September 27th returning to the UK with the Rank of Flight Lt. Thom became an instructor with 55 OTU at Annan on November 17th moving to Kirton in Linsay on March 12th 1944 to join 53 OTU. He was appointed Flight Commander Fighter Affiliation Flight at 84 (Bomber) OTU at Husbands Bosworth on May 19th 1944 and remained there until October 10th when he went to RAF Peterhead as Adjutant. His final posting was to HQ13 Group, Inverness on May 8th 1945 as a Staff Officer and retired from the RAF on December 4th 1945 as a Flight Lt.


Wing Commander Roger Morewood (deceased)
An uncle suggested to Roger Morewood that he should join the RAF so Roger did at the age of 17. Roger said : I was going be a pilot, that was the only reason to join. Roger trained to fly in a Tiger Moth biplane before joining 56 Squadron - regarded within the RAF as an elite unit - flying open cockpit Gauntlet fighters. The squadron were then re-equipped with Gloster Gladiators - the last RAF biplane - then the Hawker Hurricanes that would join Spitfires in fighting off Hitlers Luftwaffe in the Battle of Britain. While serving with 56 Squadron Roger Morewood was assigned the dangerous role of long-range fighter sweeps over the coast of occupied France and Holland but left to help form 248 Sqn at Hendon with whom he served throughout the Battle of Britain flying Blenheims. Roger said: We had a few panic station alerts when we were scrambled. We wouldd be leaping into our aircraft with flying suits over our pyjamas as we tried to get into the air in a minute and a half. In July 1942 Morewood went to 9 OTU and later HQ Transport Command. After a long post-war career in the RAF he retired in 1957. Roger Morewood once said of his squadron: It was damned dodgy. We had a high loss rate on operations. And on one sortie - then aged 21 - he nearly met his maker : I flew across to Den Helder (Northern Holland) in a long-nosed Blenheim to look after this battleship at the entrance to the Zuiderzee. We flew round this thing and sure enough I saw some aircraft coming up. They were twin-engine bombers naturally - Messerschmitt 110s. That was a bit hairy. My two blokes (other pilots) shoved off in a hurry into a cloud, and there was me popping away until I ran out of ammunition. There was just me left. I realised there was no point chasing - I was not going to knock his wings off. So I started flying home. After making hardly any noise all flight the chap (navigator) in the back said you haveve got somebody on your tail now - you had better move swiftly. So I moved to left and right. We got a pretty hefty clobbering. His turret disappeared at the back. My poor navigator wore a tin hat and I dont blame him. He got a bullet half way through his armour. He was alright. I had a dreadful wound. If I shook my hand really hard I could get blood out of one finger. I was hit all over the place. We took dozens of bullets. The aircraft was ruined. That is all there was to it. We were still going home - even with the North Sea to go across. So I trundled off back and ditched the damn thing. Thank God it didnt blow up. We literally got away with it. It was the hairiest trip I ever did. On another occasion, Roger intercepted a German weather forecasting flying boat called Weary Willy : I was in a Beaufighter at this time. I flew upwind and had a shot at him downwind. Then all the guns jammed. So I pulled alongside him - not too close - and waved him good luck lad. Anyway he sank when he got back to Norway. That was that one finished. Flying from Shetland, his squadron attacked German shipping off Norway. Roger was rested and spent two years training new Beaufighter pilots but still managed to go on some operations, mainly attacking convoys off the coast of Holland. Roger Morewood said: job was to attack the flak ships, floating anti-aircraft batteries, so other Beaufighters could attack the cargo ships. It could be pretty hairy as 12 Beaufighters lined up to have a crack at the target. You wouldd see tracer shells from your mates plane whizzing over your head or underneath you. They were a bigger danger than the Germans Wing Commander Roger Morwood was posted to the Mediterranean where he contracted TB. He recalled: "In hospital, they treated you with whisky in milk and a pint of Guinness for breakfast, very primitive stuff." When the war ended and the RAF were scaled down, Roger continued to serve in various postings around the UK until 1947. after leaving the RAF Roger was recalled again as an instructor at the Central Flying School, but with the rank of flight lieutenant. He was posted to Edinburgh and then Glasgow University squadrons. finnaly leaving service in 1957. Wing Commander Roger Morewood notched up more than 5000 flying hours in 32 different types of aircraft. Roger Morewood died in early December 2014.

The Aircraft :
NameInfo
GladiatorGLOSTER GLADIATOR: A continuation form the Gloster Gauntlet aircraft the Gloster Gladiator (SS37) becoming designated the F.7/30 was named Gladiator on the 1st July 1935. The first 70 Gladiators had Under wing machine guns (Vickers or Lewis) before the browning became standard The first aircraft arrived at Tangmere airfield on in February 1937 to no. 72 squadron. at the outbreak of world war two a total of 218 Gladiators had been received by the Royal air force with a total of 76 on active service. They served also in the Middle eats and in 1940 when Italy joined the war was nearly the only front line fighter in the middle east. Between 1939 and 1941. the Gloster Gladiator flew in many war zones. flying in France, Greece, Norway, Crete Egypt Malta and Aden. The Aircraft claimed nearly 250 air victories. It stayed in front line duties until 1942, then becoming fighter trainer, and other sundry roles. It continued in these roles until the end of world war two. The Naval equivalent the Sea Gladiator a short service in the Middle east and European waters. A Total of 746 aircraft were built of these 98 were Sea Gladiators.. Performance. speed: 250mph at 17,500 feet, 257 mph at 14,600 Range 430 miles. Armament: Two fixed .3-03 browning machine guns

This Week's Half Price Art

 A pair of Spitfire Mk.IXEs of 611 Squadron make their way home from a patrol during the summer of 1942.  At this time 611 Squadron were based at Kenley and were the first squadron to receive the new Mk.IX putting it on equal terms, for the first time, with the formidable Focke-Wulf 190.

Spitfire Mk.IXE by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 On the afternoon of 5th September 1940, Spitfires of 41 Sqn intercepted a large formation of Heinkel 111 bombers and their escorts over the Thames estuary, en route for London.  Flying N3162 as Red 2, Flight Lieutenant Eric Lock attacked the bombers head on as they began to turn north.  In a fraught combat, Lock was to destroy two He.111s and a Bf.109 on that single mission, setting him on course to become the highest scoring ace in the RAF during the Battle of Britain with sixteen confirmed victories and one shared.  His final total at the end of the war was twenty six kills confirmed and eight probables.

Total Commitment by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 Gazelle of Army Air Corps 661 Squadron on a reconnaissance mission for British 7th Armoured Division during Operation Desert Storm.

Desert Gazelle by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - 35.00
 The Beaufighters of No.144 Sqn wrought havoc on Axis shipping in the North Sea from their base at Dallachy in Scotland during 1944-45.  Here, Mk X NT961 (PL-O) has singled out a lone vessel and dealt it the full salvo of rockets and machine gun fire.

Hit and Run - Tribute to No.144 Squadron by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00

 As cuts to the RAF and other armed services by the Labour Government were implemented in the late 1960s, Flt Lt Alan R Pollock of No.1 Sqn took it upon himself to stage a very personal protest whilst en route to West Raynham from Tangmere on 5th April 1968.  Peeling away from the rest of his flight immediately after take off, Pollock flew low-level to London where he buzzed the Houses of Parliament three times before flying his Hawker Hunter FGA.9 under the upper spans of Tower Bridge. The incident is now part of British aviation folklore, but Pollock was immediately removed from flying duties for his audacity.  He will always be recorded in history, however, as the first pilot to fly a jet aircraft <i>through</i> Tower Bridge.

Take it to the Bridge by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 Having been posted to help relieve the pressure on the Allied forces in Burma, Frank Carey's 135 Sqn found themselves immediately in action against the Japanese.  On 29th January 1942, Carey's first victim was the Nakajima Ki.27 'Nate' of Sgt-Maj Nagashima of the 77th Sentai, his aircraft falling close to the RAF airfield at Mingaladon Township, Rangoon.  The following month, Carey scored again, claiming three more confirmed Ki.27s, a reconnaissance aircraft, a transport aircraft and another Ki.27.

Ace of Burma - Tribute to Wing Commander Frank Carey by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 Lancasters of 617 Sqn <i>Dambusters</i> get airborne from their Scampton base at the start of their journey to the Ruhr Valley on the night of 16th May 1943 under the codename <i>Operation Chastise</i>.  These are aircraft of the First Wave, led by Wing Commander Guy Gibson, the Second Wave having already departed some ten minutes earlier to negotiate a more northerly route to their targets.  On this momentous night, both the Möhne and Eder dams were successfully breached, whilst the Sorpe was also hit, but without serious damage.  Of the nineteen aircraft that took part in the mission, eleven returned safely.

The Dambusters by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - 105.00
 Three Gloster Meteor F.Mk4s of 222 'Natal' Squadron are depicted on a training sortie over the Forth Bridge in the early 1950s.

222 Sqn Meteors over the Forth Bridge by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - 50.00

This Week's Half Price Sport Art

 Neil Hodgson celebrates winning the World Superbike Championship at Assen, September 2003.
No.1 by Dave Foord.
Half Price! - 130.00
 At the end of the first race of the 2003 season, Neil Hodgson raises his fist in salute, serving notice that this year - 2003 - the title of Champion would be his.
Serving Notice by Robert Tomlin.
Half Price! - 30.00
 Michael Schumacher hurtles round the famous Eau Rouge corner at the Spa-Francorchamps circuit at the Belgian Grand Prix.  Schumacher won this event in his Ferrari in 1996, 1997, 2001 and 2002, completing a total of 6 wins at one of the legendary Formula One circuits.

Schumacher at Spa by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
Winning yet another G1, the Lockinge Stakes at Newbury in what was to be her last race.
Russian Rythm by Stephen Smith.
Half Price! - 100.00

This Week's Half Price Military Art

DHM1166GS. General Erwin Rommel with the Africa Korps before the Battle for Tobruk  by Chris Collingwood.

General Erwin Rommel with the Africa Korps before the Battle for Tobruk by Chris Collingwood. (GS)
Half Price! - 300.00
A Viking raiding party comes ashore from their Viking longboat on the western coast of England, 890 A.D.

Sons of Odin by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - 60.00
<b>Slightly noticeable mark on the image - hence the low price of this item. </b>

AD43 by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - 27.50
 1st Battalion in action at Escaut Canal, Belgium, May 1940. The last Highland Regiment to wear a kilt in battle, attacking the Germans at the River Escaut.  From the Diary of Captain R. Leah, 1st Battalion, Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders : Tuesday 21st May : Bn left Ere about 2 a.m. to march back. Fortunately Coy Cmdr. were required for some sort of recce and we went in C.O.s car.  Arrived Taintignies 3 a.m. and self went out again with Wilkie in C.O.s car to look for for C Coy which had gone astray, and to see Q.M. about Bn rations in Wez-Velvain.  Could not find either.  Met the Battalion arriving from Ere when I left the village at 3 a.m.  Got back myself at 4 a.m. found empty house which I entered by window and slept well for 5 hours. Officers mess going in house beside M.T. park, and had good breakfast.  Fairly quiet morning and orders to move this afternoon to Bn assembly position S of Wez-Velvain.  Thence we were directed to Merlin and prepared for counter-attack to drive enemy off Western side of Escaut.

The Charge of the 1st Battalion Queens Own Cameron Highlanders by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00

 

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