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Dogfight over Asch, Belgium, 09.20 a.m., New Years Day, 1st January 1945 by David Pentland. (P) - DavidPentland.com

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Dogfight over Asch, Belgium, 09.20 a.m., New Years Day, 1st January 1945 by David Pentland. (P)


Dogfight over Asch, Belgium, 09.20 a.m., New Years Day, 1st January 1945 by David Pentland. (P)

As the four P51D Mustangs of Major William T Haltons Yellow Flight, 487th Fighter Squadron took off from Asch, they found themselves in the middle of a massive German attack. That New Years Day the Luftwaffe had launched hundreds of aircraft in low level raids against the allied airfields across Northern France and Belgium. The unexpected take-off by the 487th however, ended Jagdgeswader 11s chances of success, with Yellow Flight alone claiming 9 enemy aircraft destroyed.
Item Code : DHM1570PDogfight over Asch, Belgium, 09.20 a.m., New Years Day, 1st January 1945 by David Pentland. (P) - This Edition
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ORIGINAL
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Original painting by David Pentland.

Size 26 inches x 18 inches (66cm x 46cm)Artist : David PentlandHalf
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Other editions of this item : Dogfight over Asch, Belgium, 09.20 a.m., New Years Day, 1st January 1945 by David Pentland.DHM1570
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 200 giclee art prints. Image size 26 inches x 16 inches (66cm x 41cm)Artist : David Pentland60 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!
Supplied with one or more  free art prints!
Now : 140.00VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 26 inches x 16 inches (66cm x 41cm)Artist : David Pentland60 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!
Supplied with one or more  free art prints!
Now : 195.00VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
PROOF
Small limited edition of 20 artist proofs. Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm) Powell, Robert
+ Artist : David Pentland
20 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!
Supplied with one or more  free art prints!
Now : 90.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINT Signed limited edition of 50 prints. Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm) Powell, Robert
+ Artist : David Pentland
30 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!
Supplied with one or more  free art prints!
Now : 65.00VIEW EDITION...
PRESENTATIONPresentation Edition of 5 Artist Proofs, supplied double matted. Image size 26 inches x 16 inches (66cm x 41cm) Carson, Leonard Kit (matted)
Goebel, Bob (matted)
Curtis, Bob (matted)
Loving, George (matted)
Brooks, Jim (matted)
+ Artist : David Pentland
Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!600.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : David Pentland
on separate certificate
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The Aircraft :
NameInfo
MustangThe ubiquitous North American P-51 Mustang, which many consider to be the best all-around fighter of WW II, owes its origins to the British Air Ministry. Following Britains entry into WW II in 1939, the RAF was interested in purchasing additional fighter aircraft from American sources, particularly the Curtiss P-40. Curtiss, which was busy, was unable to guarantee timely delivery so the British approached North American Aviation as a possible second source for the P-40. North American chose to propose its own fighter design which would use the same Allison engine as the P-40. Utilizing new laminar flow wings, the North American fighter was expected to have performance better than the P-40. Developed in record time the new aircraft was designated as a Mustang I by the Brits, whereas the USAAF ordered two for evaluation which were designated XP-51 Apaches. Intrigued with the possibility of using this aircraft also as a dive bomber, North American proposed this to the USAAF which decided to order 500 of the P-51 aircraft to be modified for dive bombing use. Designated as the A-36 Invader, this version of the Mustang utilized dive flaps, and bomb racks under each wing. Some reinforcing of the structural members was also required because of the G-forces to be encountered in dive bombing. A-36s entered combat service with the USAAF prior to any P-51s. In early 1943 the 86th and 27th Fighter Bomber Groups of the 12th Air Force began flying A-36s out of Northern Africa. Despite some early problems with instability caused by the dive flaps, the A-36 was effective in light bombing and strafing roles. It was not, however, capable of dog fighting with German fighters, especially at higher altitudes. Despite these drawbacks one USAAF pilot, Captain Michael T. Russo, who served with the 16th Bomb Squadron of the 27th Fighter Bomber Group, was credited with five confirmed aerial victories in the A-36, thereby becoming the first mustang ace.

This Week's Half Price Art

 Boeing B29 Superfortresses of the USAAF 40th Bomb Group come under attack from a Kawasaki Ki64 Hein (Tony) of the Japanese Army Airforces 244th Sentai.

Mission to Yokohama, Japan, June 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 Celebrating its 50th year of faithful service in 2012, the Vickers VC10 has proved to be one of the most enduring types in British aviation.  The final role for these elegant veterans has been to provide mid-air refueling for the RAF, as typified here by C.1K XV106 'W' of 101 Sqn, Brize Norton.  Retirement is planned for March 2013 for the final few serving aircraft, closing a significant chapter in the history of jet age.

Tribute to the VC10 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
Mustangs of 434th Fighter Squadron head across the Channel.  On 25th May 1944, pilots of the 434 Fighter Squadron flew their first combat mission.  In the early hours of 6 thJune, D-Day, included in the 12,000 aircraft which flew cover, interdiction or other support missions were 434th pilots, some who flew three missions, returning to base long enough to refuel and rearm.  Not until 29th July 1944 did the 434 Fighter Squadron down its first aircraft , when 1 Lt Arthur F. Jeffrey, one of the original six pilots assigned to the squadron, bagged an Me-163 Komet, a rocket-propelled interceptor.  Over the next nine months squadron members flew bomber escort missions, attacked air fields and flew other missions as required, including support of beleaguered ground forces around Bastogne, Belgium, better known as the Battle of the Bulge.  On 25th April 1945, pilots flew their last combat mission and 1 Lt Hilton O. Thomas shot down the last aircraft credited to an Eighth Air Force pilot - an Arado 234 Blitz, a jet-powered bomber.  Of the four aces the from the 434th Fighter Squadron, three top aces evolved - Arthur F. Jeffery, Robin Olds and George W. Gleason.

Gathering Storm by Anthony Saunders (GL)
Half Price! - 250.00
 Posted to 64 Squadron on 1st July 1940, </a>the tragically short relationship of Sub Lt F Dawson Paul with the Spitfire was crammed with victories.  He immediately shared a Dornier Do17 off Beachy Head and, just four days later claimed a Messerschmitt Bf.109.  Further kills were confirmed over the next two weeks, among them five Bf.110s and another Do.17. His final victory was a Bf.109 on 25th, but on this day he fell to the guns of the German ace Adolf Galland.  Dawson Paul was rescued from the English Channel by a German E-boat, but died of his wounds five days later as a prisoner of war.

The Longest July by Ivan Berryman. (B)
Half Price! - 70.00

 Douglas C-47s of the 439th Troop Carrier Group, 94th Troop Carrier Squadron, approach the Drop Zone above Normandy on the night of 5th / 6th June 1944 at the start of Operation Overlord.

Drop Zone Ahead by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - 75.00
 A pair of Spitfire Mk.IXs of 402 Squadron Royal Canadian Air Force, based at Kenley, practise combat manoeuvres in the skies above Kent in May, 1943.

Spitfire Alley by Ivan Berryman. (H)
Half Price! - 80.00
 With his personal emblem of black and white fuselage band adorning his Fokker E.V, 153/18, Richard Wenzl briefly commanded Jasta 6, based at Bernes in August 1918, and claimed a modest 6 victories during his career with JG 1. The Fokker E.V was both fast and manoeuvrable, but a series of engine and structural failures meant that these exciting new machines saw only brief service before being re-worked to emerge as the D.VIII, sadly too late to make any impression on the war. Wenzl is shown here in combat with Sopwith Camels of 203 Sqn, assisted by Fokker D.VIIs, which served alongside the E.Vs of Jasta 6. The D.VII shown is that of Ltn d R Erich Just of Jasta 11, also based at Bernes.

Leutnant d R Richard Wenzl by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 Following the initial parachute drops at Maleme (West) and Canea (Middle) Group East, comprising of Fallschirmjager Regiment 1 and 2nd battalion FJR2, prepared for their descent on Crete. Charged with the capture of Heraklion and its aerodrome, their departure was postponed until late afternoon due to the repairs and refuelling needed for the returning Junker 52 transports.

The Second Wave, Greece, 20th May 1941 by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - 50.00

This Week's Half Price Sport Art

GIPN0129GS. A Village Celebrity, 1883 by Walter Dendy Sadler (1854-1923) (GS)

A Village Celebrity, 1883 by Walter Dendy Sadler (1854-1923) (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00
SPC5003. Rory Underwood by Rodger Towers.

Rory Underwood by Rodger Towers.
Half Price! - 60.00
 Damon Hill at the height of his career driving the Williams Renault FW18, gave on of his finest performances at the 1996 San Marino Grand Prix at Imola. Starting second on the grid he shot off the line to go side by side with pole sitter Michael Schumacher. Their dreams were temporarily shattered when David Coulthard flew by in the Maclaren after making an incredible start. The race developed into a three car scrap with Hill apparently struggling to stay with the leaders. What everyone didnt know however was the strategy of the Williams which meant that Hill was able to stay out for an amazing 26 laps and after he pitted he managed to come out in front of Schumacher and Coulthard. By lap 39 the Williams and Ferrari pair were only 1.5 seconds apart. Further stops and some controversial hold ups by the battle between by Diniz and Hakkinen allowed Hill to extend his lead, eventually winning the race by a comfortable 16 seconds. This was to be Hills year and he went on to win the 1996 Formula One World Drivers Championship.

Towards Victory by Robert Tomlin
Half Price! - 30.00
Johnny Herbert is shown in the Benetton B195.  Herbert took a deserved victory at his home British Grand Prix at Silverstone, beating the Ferrari of Frenchman Jean Alesi into second place by more than 16 seconds, and ahead of fellow briton David Coulthard in the third placed Williams.  He also claimed victory at the Italian Grand Prix at Monza.  Along with Michael Schumachers nine victories, Herbert  helped Benetton win their first constructors championship in the 1995 season.  The Formula One Benetton B195 was designed by Rory Byrne and Ross Brawn for use in the 1995 Formula One season by Benetton.  The B195 was almost identical to the B194 but for a change of engine supplier from Ford to Renault V10 engine, the same type the rival Williams team was using.  With his first two Formula One wins under his belt in 1995, Johnny Herbert won just one more race, winning at the Nurburgring at the European Grand Prix in 1999, racing for Stewart Ford.  He retired from Formula One in 2000.

Johnny Herbert/ Benetton B.195 by Ivan Berryman (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00

This Week's Half Price Military Art

Last stand of General Custer at the Battle of Little Big Horn. General George Armstrong Custer and the 7th cavalrys last stand at the battle of Little Big Horn.

Battle of the Little Big Horn by Brian Palmer (General Custer) (P)
Half Price! - 1700.00
 King Edward the 2nd on the field at Bannockburn with his body guard near.  He would later leave the battle in his escape as the battle was lost to Robert the Bruce.

Edward II at the Battle of Bannockburn by Jason Askew.
Half Price! - 70.00
 Panzer v Ausf. D Panthers of SS Panther Division Das Reich make their debut during the initial stages of the German summer offensive for Kursk. This unit with others of the SS Panzer Korps made the deepest advances into the well-prepared Soviet lines. Complete success however, was to elude them when outrunning their supporting divisions at Prokhorovka they were forced to halt for six days.

Operation Zitadelle by David Pentland. (C)
Half Price! - 120.00
 Battle of Agincourt, October 25th 1415. Fought during the Hundred years war at the end of the English Invasion of 1415. King Henry the V of England, after his conquest of Harfleur marched his army of 1,000 Knights and 5,000 Archers (many of which were Welsh) towards Calais. He marched to Amiens as flooding had affected the river at the Somme which was the direct route. This delay helped the French army of 20,000 strong under the command of the Constable Charles dAlbret and Marshal Jean Bouciquaut II. The French army blocked Henry V route to Calais, giving the English no choice but to fight. Henry V positioned his army at Agincourt, between to wooded areas giving a frontage of 1100 metres. Henry deployed his force into three divisions; each group had archers at each flank. He had chosen his position well, in front of his army was ploughed fields and due to the heavy raid was very muddy. Due to the narrow battlefield area the French army lost their advantage of superior numbers. At 11 oclock the English started to advance their archers within 2509 yards of the French, getting them into range of the French lines. The French line of Cavalry advanced at a slow pass due to the heavy mud, They took heavy losses from the arrows from the English Long Bowman. They were eventually repulsed by the Archers who as the French cavalry approached changed from using longbows for axes and swords. The French second Cavalry line advanced only to be finally repulsed after hand to hand fighting. The commander Duc dAlencon was killed in the attack. The second charge had failed and many of the French knights were taken prisoner. Believing he had been attacked in the rear Henry V ordered that the prisoners were to be put to death. In fact There was no real rear attack it was French Camp followers plundering the English Camp. The French camp followers were quickly dealt with and the English again prepared itself for the next attack. The third attack never materialized as the sight of so much blood shed and piles of corpses turned the charge into a retreat. The English had won the day with losses less than 1600 compared to the French losses of over 7,000, including the capture of Bouciquaut. Henry V, his way now cleared reached Calais on the 16th November 1415. Agincourt is one of the great battles of military history, and this victory enabled Henry V to return to France in 1417 and conquer all of Normandy.

Morning of Agincourt by Sir John Gilbert. (Y)
Half Price! - 30.00

 

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